Faculty

The faculty of the Master of Public Health in Community-Oriented Public Health Practice program brings a wealth of experience in teaching, research and public health leadership. As part of the problem-based learning approach of the COPHP program, faculty members serve not only as instructors but also as facilitators, helping students develop their own solutions to the complex challenges of public health practice.

Amy Hagopian – Director

Amy Hagopian is an associate professor in the Department of Health Services and the Department of Global Health and is the director of the COPHP program. She also serves as a technical adviser to Health Alliance International, a UW center that works with ministries of health around the world to improve population health. Hagopian seeks to elevate the visibility of war as a public health problem. In 2005, she led a sister university collaboration with the University of Basrah in Iraq to bring academic public health professionals together despite war. Her main area of research involves health worker migration from low-income countries to wealthy countries. Hagopian is active in the American Public Health Association and serves on the board of College Access Now, an organization that works to assist low-income Seattle public high school students in attending college. She has an MHA and a Ph.D. in health services from the University of Washington. 

Profile hagopian@uw.edu


Katie Bell

Katie Bell is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Health Services. She also formerly served as chief operating officer of Neighborcare Health, the largest provider of primary medical and dental care in Seattle for low-income and uninsured families and individuals. Prior to joining Neighborcare in 2005, Bell spent five years as the vice president of operations at Park Nicollet Health Services in Minnesota. Before that, she served on the administrative teams of two other health systems, Heartland Health System in Missouri and Staten Island University Hospital in New York. In 2012, Bell was elected to the board of trustees of Group Health, a nonprofit health care system serving Washington and Idaho. She earned an MHA and an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh.

Profile bellkj@u.washington.edu


Stephen Bezruchka

Stephen Bezruchka is a senior lecturer in the Department of Health Services and the Department of Global Health. He worked in clinical medicine for 35 years, including more than a decade in Nepal, where he set up a hospital for training generalist doctors and worked to improve surgical services. Bezruchka founded the Population Health Forum to promote dialogue about how political, economic and social inequalities interact to affect the overall health status of society. He despairs over the relative and absolute health decline in the United States despite this nation spending more on health care than the rest of the world combined. Bezruchka was awarded the School of Public Health's Outstanding Teaching Award in 2002, the Faculty Community Service Award in 2008 and the Outstanding Faculty Mentor Award in 2017. He is on the board of directors of the Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility. Bezruchka earned an MPH from Johns Hopkins University and a M.D. from Stanford University. 

Profilesabez@uw.edu 


Sharon Bogan

Sharon Bogan is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Health Services and a communications specialist at Public Health – Seattle & King County. She is a COPHP program graduate and brings that experience, along with her knowledge of current public health issues, to her facilitation of the COPHP community development block.

Profilesharon.bogan@kingcounty.gov 


Tara Bostock

Tara Bostock is communications specialist at the Washington State Department of Health and a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Services. Her research interests include heath communication and health disparities. She earned an M.A. in communications design at the University of Baltimore and her MPH from the UW COPHP program. 

Profile | tbostock@gmail.com


Tania Busch Isaksen

Tania Busch Isaksen is a lecturer and undergraduate program coordinator for the  Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, as well as a clinical associate professor in the Department of Health Services. In addition to her teaching and administrative responsibilities, she maintains an active, practice-based research portfolio focused on public health outcomes associated with extreme heat, climate change risk communication methods, climate change-related public health adaptation planning and response, and occupational health and safety risks in the cannabis industry. Busch Isaksen has more than 25 years of environmental public health experience working in local public, private and academic settings. She earned a Ph.D. from the UW in environmental and occupational hygiene, an MPH from UW’s Online Executive MPH program, and a B.S. in environmental health from Colorado State University.

Profile tania@uw.edu 


Susan Buskin

Susan Buskin is an affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and the Department of Health Services. She has worked as an HIV epidemiologist at Public Health – Seattle & King County since the late 1980s. Her research focuses mostly on HIV, with some overlapping infectious diseases including hepatitis and tuberculosis. She has served as a principal investigator on several HIV surveillance projects, including incidence and drug resistance surveillance. Buskin has also investigated clinical outcomes among individuals with HIV infection. Buskin earned a Ph.D. in epidemiology at the University of Washington.

Profile susan.buskin@kingcounty.gov 


Elise Chayet

Elise Chayet is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Services and director of external and community affairs at Harborview Medical Center, the region's Level 1 Trauma Center and the largest safety net hospital in Washington state. Prior to joining Harborview in 1995, Chayet was the county division director at Public Health – Seattle & King County. Before moving into public health, Chayet provided advocacy for low-income residents in public entitlement programs and housing at Evergreen Legal Services. From 2011 to 2016, Chayet served on the City of Seattle's Families and Education Levy Oversight Committee, providing guidance to the city on its implementation of the levy and the Preschool for All program. Chayet formerly served on the board of the Mockingbird Society, and she's currently on the governing board of the King County Accountable Community of Health. Chayet earned her MHA at the University of Washington. 

Profileechayet@uw.edu 


Bill Daniell

Bill Daniell, an associate professor emeritus in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, is a physician and epidemiologist with teaching, practical and research experience in environmental, occupational and general public health. He received the School of Public Health Outstanding Teaching Award in 2002 and 2011. Although Daniell is technically retired from the UW, he maintains active part-time faculty affiliations in teaching, mentorship and research roles. He is currently a member of the King County Board of Health. Daniell's current activities are mostly based in Washington state, but his other interests include environmental and occupational health problems in Southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam. He earned an MPH at the University of Washington and a M.D. at Tufts University.

Profile bdaniell@uw.edu


Omid Bagheri Garakani

‚ÄčOmid Bagheri Garakani is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Services. His research interests include racism, health equity and policy. A graduate of the UW COPHP program, he also earned a BA in medical anthropology from the UW. 

Profile | omidbg@uw.edu


Karen Hartfield

Karen Hartfield is a lecturer in the Department of Health Services and an administrator for the HIV/STD Program at of Public Health – Seattle & King County. She has worked in HIV prevention, communicable disease prevention, immunization promotion, asthma prevention and family planning in public health settings for more than two decades. She earned an MPH at the University of North Carolina.

Profilekaren.hartfield@kingcounty.gov


Jsani Henry

Jsani Henry is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Health Services and the prevention education manager for the HIV/STD Program at Public Health – Seattle & King County. A COPHP graduate, he serves as the program's practicum director. He has over 15 years of experience in the field of HIV and STD prevention and treatment, particularly with minority and marginalized populations. Henry has an MPH and a MSW from the University of Washington.

Profilejsani.henry@kingcounty.gov


Deb Hinchey

Deb Hinchey is a senior lecturer in the Department of Health Services. A COPHP graduate, she is responsible for developing curriculum for and teaching the undergraduate public health capstone project course and honors seminar. Hinchey was the director of health promotion at Seattle University for many years, where she focused on assessing college students' health needs and developing interventions to improve student health outcomes in areas such as sexual health, alcohol and other drug use, sexual assault and mental health. Hinchey earned an MPH from the University of Washington.

Profilehinchd@uw.edu


Peter House

Peter House is a senior lecturer emeritus in the Department of Health Services. He has wide experience in rural health, community organizing and development, strategic planning, program evaluation, meeting facilitation, community assessments and adult education. A former director of the COPHP program, House earned his MHA at the University of Michigan.

Profilephinney6@uw.edu


Chris Hurley

Chris Hurley is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Health Services. She has been an advocate and activist for improved health care for underserved populations in Seattle since the 1970s. Hurley was the founding director of the Pike Market Medical Clinic, a community health center serving downtown Seattle, and a cofounder of the Pike Place Market Foundation. She previously served as the administrator for Group Health Eastside Hospital. She was also the founding director of Bailey-Boushay House, a specialized care facility for people living with AIDS, and later served as CEO of Goosefoot Community Foundation, a community and economic development organization on Whidbey Island. Since 2010, Hurley has worked as a consultant to public and private health and human services organizations. She has an MHA from the University of Washington.

Profile churley@uw.edu


Hilary Karasz

Hilary Karasz, an affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Health Services, is a public information officer and communications consultant at Public Health – Seattle & King County. She has a particular interest in mobile health, and she studies the use of technologies such as text messaging to bridge communication gaps and reduce inequities across King County communities. In addition to teaching in the COPHP program, Karasz teaches health promotion and communication in the Executive MPH program. She is also a faculty researcher at the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice, where she conducts research in emergency communications. Karasz earned a Ph.D. in communications at the University of Washington.

Profilehilary.karasz@kingcounty.gov


Aaron Katz

One of the founders of the COPHP program, Aaron Katz is a principal lecturer in the Department of Health Services and an adjunct principal lecturer in the Department of Global Health and the School of Law. He has worked in health planning and policy in Washington state since 1978. From 1988 to 2003, he served as director of the UW Health Policy Analysis program. Katz received the Health Reform Leadership Award at the Washington State of Reform Health Policy Conference in 2011, the American Public Health Association's Award for Excellence in 2006 and the UW School of Public Health's Outstanding Teaching Award in 2004. He earned a CPH at the University of Toronto.

Profilegarlyk@uw.edu


Gita Krishnaswamy

Gita Krishnaswamy is a senior lecturer in the Department of Health Services and an affiliated faculty member with the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice (NWCPHP). Her areas of specialization include population health, quantitative methods and health education. Krishnaswamy has many years of K-12 classroom and administrative experience in the field and consults with school districts and nonprofit organizations interested in health equity, the bidirectional relationship of education and health, and problem-based learning pedagogy. She directs the capstone experience for the COPHP program and manages community-based student projects through the NWCPHP. She earned an M.Ed. at DePaul University and an MPH at the University of Washington.

Profile krishna2@uw.edu


Eyob Mazengia

Eyob Mazengia is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Services and an affiliate instructor in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences. An environmental/public health scientist for Public Health – Seattle & King County since 2000, he supervises senior- and mid-level public health investigators in the Environmental Health Division. Mazengia specializes in the fields of environmental health, microbiology and epidemiology. His interests also include laboratory detection and prevention of food and waterborne illnesses, detection and monitoring of pathogens in the environment, design of epidemiological studies and work on public health challenges affecting economically disadvantaged communities. Mazengia has a Ph.D. in environmental and public health epidemiology from the University of Washington.

Profileeyob@u.washington.edu


Ray (Bud) Nicola

Bud Nicola is an affiliate professor in the Department of Health Services. He worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1991 until his retirement in 2012. HIs last CDC position with the CDC was as a field assignee to the UW Northwest Center for Public Health Practice in the School of Public Health. Before joining the CDC, Nicola directed Public Health – Seattle & King County and the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department. He is a former director of the COPHP program and a former member of the King County Board of Health. Currently, he chairs the national Public Health Accreditation Board. Nicola has an M.D. from the University of Oregon and a MHSA from the University of Michigan.

Profilebnicola@uw.edu


Brett Niessen

Brett Niessen, a COPHP graduate, is an affiliate instructor in the UW Department of Health Services. He works as a training manager at the nonprofit Cardea Services, providing training and technical assistance to school districts, juvenile rehabilitation facilities and afterschool programs for curricula on health relationships, teen pregnancy and HIV/STD prevention. He has also worked at Public Health – Seattle & King County in the HIV/STD Program, serving as a project manager for marketing campaigns in cooperation with several community-based agencies, and in the Family Planning Program, as a teacher trainer, curriculum writer and youth development specialist. Previously, Niessen was a middle school science teacher and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand, where he trained health teachers.

Profilebniessen@cardeaservices.org


Roxana Norouzi

Roxana Norouzi is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Services and deputy director of OneAmerica, Washington state's largest immigrant and refugee advocacy organization. Prior to joining OneAmerica, she spent five years working as a case manager with families at risk of homelessness and providing cultural competency trainings to schools and various institutions. Norouzi serves on the board of the Seattle Globalist, a global-to-local news media platform. She is also vice president of the Children's Alliance board of directors and an appointee to King County's Best Starts for Kids advisory group. In 2010, after earning her master's in social work at the University of Washington, she was awarded the Bonderman Travel Fellowship, which allowed her to travel to 20 countries exploring and reporting on post-conflict regions, migration trends and identity.

Profileroxnoroz@hotmail.com


Ian Painter

Ian Painter is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Health Services and a biostatistician at the Foundation for Health Care Quality. His research interests include disease surveillance, public health informatics, statistical computing, statistical graphics, clinical trials and statistical genetics. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Washington.

Profile ipainter@uw.edu


Aley Joseph Pallickaparambil

Aley Joseph Pallickaparambil is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Services. She also serves as an epidemiologist with Public Health – Seattle & King County, where she uses data mining, biostatistical and epidemiological tools to do public health assessment and surveillance, evaluation, geospatial mapping, and record linkage. In public health, her areas of interest include American Indian and Alaska Native tribal communities, maternal and child health, homelessness, mental health and substance use, and reproductive health access. Pallickaparambil previously worked in public health surveillance and evaluation among Native American communities in California, and on malaria surveillance in rural southern India.

Profileajpalli@uw.edu


Gerry Pollet

Gerry Pollet is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Services and a representative in the Washington State House of Representatives. He has 30 years of experience working on risk assessment and standards for environmental contamination, including exposure scenarios. He co-founded and now serves as executive director for Heart of America Northwest, the region's largest citizens' watchdog group for the cleanup of America's most contaminated area: the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The School of Public Health honored Heart of America Northwest and Pollet with its 2010 community service partner award. Pollet was one of the contributing authors of Washington's Model Toxics Control Act and drafted provisions updating the law and its rules for risk assessment, public involvement and allowing for cleanup and reuse of industrial properties. He has served on numerous agency advisory boards relating to hazardous substance cleanup. He has also lectured and presented in numerous forums on risk assessment and public input to exposure scenarios in hazardous waste site cleanup planning and is frequently cited in national and regional news media. Pollet has a J.D. from the University of Washington.

Profile gpollet@uw.edu


Sarah Ross-Viles

Sarah Ross-Viles is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Health Services. An alumna of the COPHP program, she manages the UW Tobacco Studies Program. She previously worked at Public Health – Seattle & King County, where she managed multiple county-wide programs aimed at developing and implementing policy and systems approaches to address tobacco use, exposure and related disparities. Ross-Viles has also served as a Dorot Fellow in environmental health and justice at the Conservation Law Foundation in Boston. 

Profile sarahrv@uw.edu


Jack Thompson

Jack Thompson is a principal lecturer emeritus in the Department of Health Services and has been a faculty member of the department since 1994. He served as director of the UW Northwest Center for Public Health Practice from 2000 to 2008. Prior to that appointment, Thompson worked for 10 years at Public Health – Seattle & King County. As director of the Seattle Health Services Division, he helped establish teen health clinics in public high schools in collaboration with Seattle Public Health Schools and a range of community providers, including hospitals and health centers. Thompson has also served as executive director of Puget Sound Neighborhood Health Centers of Seattle, a consortium of community health centers now known as Neighborcare Health. He has a MSW from the University of Washington.

Profile jackt@uw.edu


Wayne Turnberg

Wayne Turnberg is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences and the director of communicable disease epidemiology at the Washington State Department of Health.

turnberg@uw.edu


Ann Vander Stoep

Ann Vander Stoep is an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and an associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology. She is a child psychiatric epidemiologist and co-director of the Developmental Pathways Research Program at the UW Child Health Institute. Her research interests include developmental epidemiology of adolescent depression; transition to adulthood for adolescents with psychiatric disorders; comorbidity of child mental health problems; and developing, implementing and disseminating promising children's mental health interventions in school settings. She earned a Ph.D. in epidemiology at the University of Washington.

Profile annv@uw.edu