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Master of Public Health in Community-Oriented Public Health Practice

Faculty

The faculty of the Master of Public Health in Community-Oriented Public Health Practice program brings a wealth of experience in teaching, research and public health leadership. As part of the problem-based learning approach of the COPHP program, faculty members serve not only as instructors but also as facilitators, helping students develop their own solutions to the complex challenges of public health practice.

Core Faculty

Stephanie Farquhar — Interim Program Director

Stephanie Ann Farquhar is the School of Public Health associate dean for evaluation and improvement and clinical professor in the Departments of Health Systems and Population Health & Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences. She draws from community-based participatory research principles to address social and environmental equity. In partnership with community organizations and agencies, Farquhar has co-led research on a project to reduce pesticides exposure among indigenous farmworkers in Oregon and was the principal investigator of a project assessing the health effects of Seattle's Yesler Terrace affordable housing redevelopment. She works closely with Public Health – Seattle & King County, served as board president of Community-Campus Partnerships for Health, and teaches core courses in the Public Health-Global Health undergraduate major and the Master of Public Health program at the UW. She has a doctorate in public health from the University of Michigan.

Profile | farqs@uw.edu


Genya Shimkin — Associate Program Director and Capstone Director

Genya Shimkin (she/they) is an assistant teaching professor in the Department of Family Medicine and the associate director and capstone director for the COPHP program. Genya’s areas of expertise include LGBTQ+ health, harm reduction and anti-oppression frameworks for health promotion. In addition to working at UW, Genya is founder and CEO of Q Card Project LLC, which offers education and communication tools, plus training and consultation for health systems looking to improve their practice with LGBTQ+ communities. Genya earned a bachelor's degree in human rights and Russian studies from Bard College and an MPH from the UW in the COPHP program.

Profile | gshimkin@uw.edu


Francesca Collins — Curriculum Director

Francesca Collins is a clinical faculty member in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and serves as the curriculum director for the COPHP program. Francesca works as a prevention education consultant for the HIV/STD Program at Public Health – Seattle & King County. Her field of expertise includes HIV/STDs, sexual health and reproductive justice, community outreach and advocacy, and overdose prevention and harm reduction practices at the intersection of substance use and communicable diseases. She earned an MPH at the UW in the COPHP program.

Profile | fdcoll@uw.edu


Katie Bell

Katie Bell is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She also formerly served as chief operating officer of Neighborcare Health, the largest provider of primary medical and dental care in Seattle for low-income and uninsured families and individuals. Prior to joining Neighborcare in 2005, Bell spent five years as the vice president of operations at Park Nicollet Health Services in Minnesota. Before that, she served on the administrative teams of two other health systems, Heartland Health System in Missouri and Staten Island University Hospital in New York. In 2012, Bell was elected to the board of trustees of Group Health, a nonprofit health care system serving Washington and Idaho. She earned an MHA and an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh.

Profile | bellkj@u.washington.edu


Sharon Bogan

Sharon Bogan is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and a communications specialist at Public Health – Seattle & King County. She has an MPH from the UW in the COPHP program and brings that experience, along with her knowledge of current public health issues, to her facilitation of the COPHP community development block.

Profilesharon.bogan@kingcounty.gov


Roxana Chen

Roxana Chen is an affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and a social research scientist at Public Health – Seattle & King County. She has extensive experience developing and conducting evaluations of chronic disease prevention projects, working with low-income groups and communities of color, and collaborating with community partnerships to promote health equity. Her research interests and past work include obesity prevention; chronic disease disparities; community-based participatory research; cross-sectoral strategies to improve health; and evaluating the impacts of policy, systems and environmental change approaches on health inequities. She received her doctorate in health services from the UW.

Profile | Roxana.Chen@kingcounty.gov


Ashenafi  Cherkos

Ashenafi Cherkos is a pre-doctoral instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and teaches quantitative methods in the COPHP program. He is also a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology, and his main research interests involve maternal and child health, including nutritional disorders, growth and development, infectious disease and health care utilization practices. He was formerly an assistant professor of public health at Mekelle University, Ethiopia, where he taught epidemiology, biostatistics and research methodology to undergraduate and graduate students. He earned an MPH from Mekelle University and an MPH in epidemiology in maternal and child health at the UW.

ashenc@uw.edu


Swee May Cripe

Swee May Cripe is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She is passionate about leveraging her skills and strengths to advance social and health equity, and engage with, advocate for and elevate voices in minority and low-resourced communities. She has extensive experience as a researcher, educator and public health professional in academic, clinical and nonprofit settings in the United States, Malaysia, Peru and Vietnam. Her research interests include maternal and child health, disparities in immigrant and refugee communities, global health, intimate partner violence, developmental screening and disabilities, and program implementation and evaluation. Her current work focuses on developing and implementing programs with an interdisciplinary team to train and support community health providers who serve children with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities and behavioral needs in Washington state. Cripe grew up in Malaysia, where she studied plant biology. She earned an MPH in epidemiology and a doctorate in ecosystem science from the UW. 

smtang.uw@gmail.com


Karen Hartfield

Karen Hartfield is a lecturer in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and an administrator for the HIV/STD Program at Public Health – Seattle & King County. She has worked in HIV prevention, communicable disease prevention, immunization promotion, asthma prevention and family planning in public health settings for more than two decades. She earned an MPH at the University of North Carolina.

Profilekhartf@uw.edu


Jsani Henry

Jsani Henry is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and the prevention education manager for the HIV/STD Program at Public Health – Seattle & King County. A COPHP graduate, he serves as the program's practicum director. He has over 15 years of experience in the field of HIV and STD prevention and treatment, particularly with minority and marginalized populations. Henry has an MPH and an MSW from the UW.

Profilejah26@uw.edu


Theresa Hoeft

Theresa Hoeft is a research assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She has worked primarily in Alaska, California and Seattle on integrated care research that unites behavioral health and primary care services, with a focus on programs that conduct outreach with community agencies to better address patients' social determinants of health. This work has also centered on reducing access barriers to treatment by bringing services into communities (e.g., adjacent to a needle exchange) and delivering care via lay health providers who may better engage patients. She has over 10 years of experience working in academic and health system settings on models that improve the reach of behavioral health care delivery. She specializes in health services research, health economics, community-based participatory research and mixed-methods research. She earned her doctorate in population health at the University of Wisconsin.

Profile | thoeft@uw.edu


Derek Jennings 

Derek Jennings (Quapaw/Sac & Fox) is the Bezruchka Family Endowed Professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population. As a tribal nations member, he works primarily with Indigenous communities as a health educator, addressing the social determinants of health related to food, diet and improving diet. He uses imaged-based and community-based participatory research methods to engage Indigenous communities throughout the research processes. Jennings earned his doctorate in curriculum and instruction health research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Profile | drj1@uw.edu


Rhonda Kaetzel

Rhonda Kaetzel is a clinical assistant professor who teaches environmental health in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She is also a regional director at the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more than 25 years, Kaetzel has investigated how environmental toxins affect the body, the environment and communities. She uses engagement techniques to communicate scientific findings to the general public, tribal members and businesses. She specializes in interpreting science for lay audiences and in developing relationships to address the impact of exposures on underserved populations experiencing health disparities. As a federal employee with trust responsibility to Alaska Natives and Native Americans, Kaetzel works to promote understanding traditions to prevent exposures experienced by Indigenous communities. Kaetzel has a doctorate in toxicology from Oregon State University. 

Profile | kaetzel@uw.edu


Hilary Karasz

Hilary Karasz is an affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and a public information officer and communications consultant at Public Health – Seattle & King County. She has a particular interest in mobile health, and she studies the use of technologies such as text messaging to bridge communication gaps and reduce inequities across King County communities. In addition to teaching in the COPHP program, Karasz teaches health promotion and communication in the UW Online Master of Public Health program. She is also a faculty researcher at the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice, where she conducts research in emergency communications. Karasz earned a doctorate in communications at the UW.

Profilehilary.karasz@kingcounty.gov


Sinang Lee

Sinang Lee is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. Since 2013 Lee has worked with Public Health – Seattle & King County (PHSKC) to invest in community partnerships to advance health equity and environmental justice. She started her career working on proper chemicals management in Central America and pesticide safety education in Cambodia. As a longtime public servant with 15 years of experience in various government roles, Lee is passionate about centering community voices in decision-making and breaking down institutional barriers. At PHSKC, Lee led the development of a community-based participatory health promotion program for the Duwamish River Superfund Site, the first of its kind for the Environmental Protection Agency. The program received the National Association of County and City Health Officials Model Practice Award in 2020. Lee also cofounded the Khmer Health Board and previously worked as a senior consultant on health impact assessments. Lee earned her MPH at the UW. 

sinang@uw.edu


Kendra Liljenquist

Kendra Liljenquist is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the School of Medicine and principal investigator at the Seattle Children's Research Institute's Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development. Liljenquist's research focuses on developing culturally responsive ways to address economic and racial disparities in child development outcomes. She collaborates with families and clinicians to design and test clinic and community-based interventions that best meet the needs of children in low-resourced communities. Liljenquist's current research centers on identifying innovative approaches to enhance developmental screening and referral practices in primary care clinics serving low-income, racial minority and linguistically diverse families. She earned an MPH at the UW and a doctorate in rehabilitation science at Boston University.

Profile | kliljen@uw.edu


Eyob Mazengia

Eyob Mazengia is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and an affiliate instructor in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences. An environmental/public health scientist for Public Health – Seattle & King County since 2000, he supervises senior- and mid-level public health investigators in the Environmental Health Division. Mazengia specializes in the fields of environmental health, microbiology and epidemiology. His interests also include laboratory detection and prevention of food and waterborne illnesses, detection and monitoring of pathogens in the environment, design of epidemiological studies and work on public health challenges affecting economically disadvantaged communities. Mazengia has a doctorate in environmental and public health epidemiology from the UW.

Profileeyob@u.washington.edu


Brett Niessen

Brett Niessen is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and a faculty member at the Northwest Public Health–Primary Care Leadership Institute. He works as a health education consultant at Seattle Children's Hospital and as an independent consultant working with school districts to implement sexual health education curricula. He was a training manager at the nonprofit Cardea Services, where he developed continuing medical education and provided training and technical assistance to school districts and community-based programs on teen pregnancy and HIV/STD prevention and healthy relationships. He also worked at Public Health – Seattle & King County in the HIV/STD Program, serving as a project manager for marketing campaigns in cooperation with several community‑based agencies, and in the Family Planning Program as a teacher trainer, curriculum writer and youth development specialist. Previously, Niessen was a middle school science teacher and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand, where he trained health teachers. He earned his MPH at the UW in the COPHP program.

Profileniessen@uw.edu


Barbara Obena

Barbara Obena is clinical instructor and teaches population health in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She is a senior manager in systems alignment and integration with the National Equity, Inclusion and Diversity team at Kaiser Permanente, where she leverages problem-based learning and group facilitation and collaboratively infuses equity throughout operations at one of the largest integrated health care systems. She finds joy in working though equity-centered design, connecting the dots for collective impact, building and sustaining relationships, sharing power and moving ideas to action. Obena has worked for Neighborcare Health, the Washington State Department of Health and Community Health Plan of Washington, and also served on the boards of International Community Health Services and Creative Reaction Lab. She earned her MPH at the UW in the COPHP program.

barbara.c.obena@kp.org


Canada Parrish

Canada Parrish is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She is a health services researcher whose work focuses on using observational and clinical trial data to improve population health initiatives and inform health policies and clinical care guidelines. She is also a research scientist for the UW Department of Emergency Medicine, where she collaborates on a variety of policy analyses, intervention evaluations and clinical improvement projects. Parrish has a strong interest in promoting improved health outcomes for vulnerable and low-resource populations both domestically and globally. She has an MSPH in international health from Johns Hopkins University and a doctorate in health services from the UW.

Profile | canada05@uw.edu


Gerry Pollet

Gerry Pollet is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and represents the 46th District in the Washington State House of Representatives. He has 30 years of experience working on risk assessment and standards for environmental contamination, including exposure scenarios. Pollet has developed and passed major public health legislation, including the first state regulation of e-cigarettes and vaping products in the U.S., procedures for testing and removing lead from school water, and requirements for funding foundational public health.

Pollet co-founded and serves as executive director for Heart of America Northwest, the region's largest citizens' watchdog group for the cleanup of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, the U.S.'s most contaminated area. The UW School of Public Health honored Heart of America Northwest and Pollet with its 2010 community service partner award. Pollet was one of the contributing authors of Washington's Model Toxics Control Act and drafted provisions updating the law and its rules for risk assessment and public involvement. He has also lectured and presented at numerous forums on risk assessment and public and Tribal input for exposure scenarios in hazardous waste site cleanup planning. Pollet has a J.D. from the UW.

Profile | gpollet@uw.edu


Hallie Pritchett 

Hallie Pritchett teaches in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She is a mixed woman, intersectional feminist and transformational global public health leader. Pritchett is a Seattle native and is deeply rooted in the community. She has experience across local and international strategic planning, policy and program innovation. Her work focuses on strengthening intersectional equity systems to mitigate health disparities. She has over six years of teaching experience within local community/technical college and university systems. Pritchett currently is the community health education manager for the Office of Community Health Outreach & Engagement at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, where she works on bi-directional and community-driven research system transformation projects. Her previous experience includes outcomes, clinical and public health research at the University of Washington, Mountain States Tumor Institute and PATH. Pritchett earned her MPH at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

hericson@uw.edu


Marc Provence  

Marc Provence is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. He served as director of the Office of Medicaid Transformation at the Washington State Health Care Authority. Prior to joining HCA, Provence was the UW administrator for the Fred Hutchinson/University of Washington Cancer Consortium and director of managed care systems for UW Physicians. Previous roles include deputy director of Washington’s Basic Health Plan and vice president for health services at HealthPlus (Blue Cross of Washington and Alaska). He has served on the Washington Public Employee Benefits Board and the Governing Council of the Pacific Hospital Preservation and Development Authority. Provence earned his MPH from the University of California.

Profile | mprov@uw.edu


Nicole Sadow-Hasenberg

Nicole Sadow-Hasenberg is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She is also the communications and HR manager at Partners for Our Children, an organization devoted to improving the lives of vulnerable children and families, especially those whose lives are impacted by child welfare systems in Washington state and nationwide. She loves working with public health students and has extensive experience in public health communications and strategy. Sadow-Hasenberg has spent her career working to improve population health, including creating a clinic for homeless youth to research state-funded drug treatment services and providing depression services for veterans. She also worked as a public information officer and strategic communications planner at Public Health – Seattle & King County. Sadow-Hasenberg earned an MPH from the UW.

Profile | hasen@uw.edu


Wayne Turnberg

Wayne Turnberg is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences and the director of communicable disease epidemiology at the Washington State Department of Health. He holds an MSPH and a doctorate in public health from the UW.

Profileturnberg_cophp@comcast.net


Britt Yamamoto

Britt Yamamoto is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Global Health. He is the co-founder and CEO of Perennial, where he manages operations, builds partnerships and facilitates leadership trainings for community-based leaders from Africa, Asia-Pacific, Latin America and the Middle East. From 2006 to 2016, Yamamoto was a core faculty member in the Center for Creative Change at Antioch University Seattle, where he led seminars and advised graduate students in social change and leadership. In 2008 he founded iLEAP, an international nonprofit creating a new generation of social leaders and global citizens throughout the world. In 2016 iLEAP was recognized as a leadership development pioneer in the social sector by the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy. Yamamota has a master's degree in community development from the University of California at Davis and a doctorate in geography from the UW.

Profile | britt@perennial.org


Affiliate Faculty

Tania Busch Isaksen

Tania Busch Isaksen is an associate teaching professor and the undergraduate program coordinator for the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences. She is co-director of the Collaborative on Extreme Event Resilience and the director of education and training for the Center for Health and Global Environment. In addition to her teaching and administrative responsibilities, she maintains an active, practice-based research portfolio focused on public health outcomes associated with extreme heat and wildfire smoke exposures, risk communication methods, climate change-related public health adaptation planning and response, and sustainable materials management. Busch Isaksen has more than 25 years of environmental public health experience working in local public, private and academic settings. She earned an MPH and a doctorate in environmental and occupational hygiene from the UW. 

Profile | tania@uw.edu


Elise Chayet

Elise Chayet is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health at the UW and director of external and community affairs at Harborview Medical Center, the region's Level 1 Trauma Center and the largest safety net hospital in Washington state. Prior to joining Harborview in 1995, Chayet was the county division director at Public Health – Seattle & King County. Before moving into public health, Chayet provided advocacy for low-income residents in public entitlement programs and housing at Evergreen Legal Services. From 2011 to 2016, Chayet served on the City of Seattle's Families and Education Levy Oversight Committee, providing guidance to the city on its implementation of the levy and the Preschool for All program. Chayet formerly served on the board of the Mockingbird Society, and she's currently on the governing board of the King County Accountable Community of Health. Chayet earned her MHA at the UW. 

Profileechayet@uw.edu 


Jason Daniel-Ulloa

Jason Daniel-Ulloa is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. He is trained in community-based participatory research and practice and has worked in local, statewide and national partnerships focused on STD/HIV prevention, vaccine promotion, cancer prevention and men’s health. In his work, he examines the intersection of race, class and gender on overall health and well-being. Daniel-Ulloa has a joint doctorate in public health from San Diego State University and the University of California San Diego. 

Profilejdaul@uw.edu


Kelly Gilmore

Kelly Gilmore is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She is also the associate director of research operations in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, where she provides operational and strategic leadership to advance and improve reproductive health research. She has over 15 years of experience working in reproductive and sexual health in clinical, advocacy and research settings. She specializes in patient-centered outcomes and qualitative research methods. She also volunteers at the local syringe exchange program and advocates for efforts to provide safe consumption spaces, naloxone distribution and hepatitis C treatment throughout the state. She earned her MPH at the UW.

Profilekellyg18@uw.edu


Chris Hurley

Chris Hurley is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She has been an advocate and activist for improved health care for underserved populations in Seattle since the 1970s. Hurley was the founding director of the Pike Market Medical Clinic, a community health center serving downtown Seattle, and a co-founder of the Pike Place Market Foundation. She previously served as the administrator for Group Health Eastside Hospital. She was also the founding director of Bailey-Boushay House, a specialized care facility for people living with AIDS, and later served as CEO of Goosefoot Community Foundation, a community and economic development organization on Whidbey Island. Since 2010, Hurley has worked as a consultant to public and private health and human services organizations. She has an MHA from the UW.

Profilechurley@uw.edu


Gita Krishnaswamy

Gita Krishnaswamy is a senior lecturer in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and an affiliated faculty member with the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice, where she manages community-based student projects. Her areas of specialization include population health, quantitative methods and health education. Krishnaswamy has many years of K–12 classroom and administrative experience and consults with school districts and nonprofit organizations interested in health equity, the bidirectional relationship of education and health, and problem-based learning pedagogy. She earned a master's degree in education at DePaul University and an MPH at the UW.

Profile |  krishna2@uw.edu


Roxana Norouzi

Roxana Norouzi is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and deputy director of OneAmerica, Washington state's largest immigrant and refugee advocacy organization. Prior to joining OneAmerica, she spent five years working as a case manager with families at risk of homelessness and providing cultural competency trainings to schools and various institutions. Norouzi serves on the board of the Seattle Globalist, a global-to-local news media platform. She is also vice president of the Children's Alliance board of directors and an appointee to King County's Best Starts for Kids advisory group. In 2010, after earning her master's in social work at the UW, she was awarded the Bonderman Travel Fellowship, which allowed her to travel to 20 countries exploring and reporting on post-conflict regions, migration trends and identity.

Profileroxnoroz@hotmail.com


Aley Joseph Pallickaparambil

Aley Joseph Pallickaparambil is a clinical instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. She is also an epidemiologist with Public Health – Seattle & King County, where she uses data mining, biostatistical and epidemiological tools to do public health assessment, evaluation and geospatial mapping. Her areas of focus include American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) health priorities, maternal and child health, mental health and substance use, and reproductive health access. Prior to moving to Seattle, Pallickaparambil worked in public health surveillance and evaluation among Native American communities in California, where she studied race misclassification for AI/AN populations and conducted and planned culturally appropriate surveillance techniques. She has spent her formative public health years conducting malaria surveillance in rural southern India. She grew up in India, where she studied mathematics and microbiology at the University of Mumbai. She earned an MPH in epidemiology and a master's in ecology and evolution from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Profileajpalli@uw.edu


Sarah Ross-Viles

Sarah Ross-Viles is an affiliate instructor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and manages the UW Tobacco Studies Program. She previously worked at Public Health – Seattle & King County, where she managed multiple countywide programs aimed at developing and implementing policy and systems approaches to address tobacco use, exposure and related disparities. Ross-Viles has also served as a Dorot Fellow in environmental health and justice at the Conservation Law Foundation in Boston. She earned her MPH at the UW in the COPHP program.

Profilesarahrv@uw.edu


Emeritus Faculty

Stephen Bezruchka

Stephen Bezruchka is a senior lecturer in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and the Department of Global Health. He worked in clinical medicine for 35 years, including more than a decade in Nepal, where he set up a hospital for training generalist doctors and worked to improve surgical services. Bezruchka founded the Population Health Forum to promote dialogue about how political, economic and social inequalities interact to affect the overall health status of society. He despairs over the relative and absolute health decline in the United States despite this nation spending more on health care than the rest of the world combined. Bezruchka was awarded the School of Public Health's Outstanding Teaching Award in 2002, the Faculty Community Service Award in 2008 and the Outstanding Faculty Mentor Award in 2017. He is on the board of directors of the Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility. Bezruchka earned an MPH from Johns Hopkins University and an M.D. from Stanford University. 

Profilesabez@uw.edu 


Bill Daniell

Bill Daniell, an associate professor emeritus in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, is a physician and epidemiologist with teaching, practical and research experience in environmental, occupational and general public health. He received the UW School of Public Health Outstanding Teaching Award in 2002 and 2011. Although Daniell is technically retired from the UW, he maintains active part-time faculty affiliations in teaching, mentorship and research roles. He is currently a member of the King County Board of Health. Daniell's current activities are mostly based in Washington state, but his other interests include environmental and occupational health problems in Southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam. He earned an MPH at the UW and a M.D. at Tufts University.

Profilebdaniell@uw.edu


Peter House

Peter House is a senior lecturer emeritus in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. He has wide experience in rural health, community organizing and development, strategic planning, meeting/retreat facilitation, community assessments, homelessness and adult education. House was a clinical associate professor at the UW School of Medicine, where he served in the WWAMI Program from 1990 to 2010. He also served as board president of ROOTS, the young adult shelter in the University District in Seattle. He received the Washington Rural Health Association’s Outstanding Contribution to Rural Health Award in 1999 and the Community Service Award from the UW School of Public Health in 2013. A former director of the COPHP program (2009–2013), House earned his MHA at the University of Michigan.

Profilephinney6@uw.edu


Aaron Katz

One of the founders of the COPHP program, Aaron Katz is a principal lecturer emeritus in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. He has worked in health planning and policy in Washington state since 1978. From 1988 to 2003, he served as director of the UW Health Policy Analysis program. Katz received the Health Reform Leadership Award at the Washington State of Reform Health Policy Conference in 2011, the American Public Health Association's Award for Excellence in 2006 and the UW School of Public Health's Outstanding Teaching Award in 2004. He earned a CPH at the University of Toronto.

Profilegarlyk@uw.edu


Ray (Bud) Nicola

Bud Nicola is an affiliate professor in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health. He worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1991 until his retirement in 2012. His last CDC position was as a field assignee to the UW Northwest Center for Public Health Practice in the School of Public Health. Before joining the CDC, Nicola directed Public Health – Seattle & King County and the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department. He is a former director of the COPHP program and a former member of the King County Board of Health. He has been a member of the national Public Health Accreditation Board. Nicola has an MHSA from the University of Michigan and an M.D. from the University of Oregon.

Profilebnicola@uw.edu


Jack Thompson

Jack Thompson is a principal lecturer emeritus in the Department of Health Systems and Population Health and has been a faculty member of the department since 1994. He served as director of the UW Northwest Center for Public Health Practice from 2000 to 2008. Prior to that appointment, Thompson worked for 10 years at Public Health – Seattle & King County. As director of the Seattle Health Services Division, he helped establish teen health clinics in public high schools in collaboration with Seattle Public Health Schools and a range of community providers, including hospitals and health centers. Thompson has also served as executive director of Puget Sound Neighborhood Health Centers of Seattle, a consortium of community health centers now known as Neighborcare Health. He has a master of social work from the UW.

Profile | jackt@uw.edu


Ann Vander Stoep

Ann Vander Stoep is a professor emeritus for the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and a professor in the Department of Epidemiology. She is a child psychiatric epidemiologist and co-director of the Developmental Pathways Research Program at the UW Child Health Institute. Her research interests include developmental epidemiology of adolescent depression; transition to adulthood for adolescents with psychiatric disorders; comorbidity of child mental health problems; and developing, implementing and disseminating promising children's mental health interventions in school settings. She earned a doctorate in epidemiology at the UW.

Profileannv@uw.edu